Goodwill Meals Drive is relentless in opposition to the load of the pandemic

Heavy pressures and troubles continue to hover over people who have been financially broken by the pandemic. That’s why the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, Butler County Food Bank, and Butler County Community Partnership continue to offer monthly assistance to people who are struggling to put food on the table. More than 320 vehicles showed up on the Lernerville Speedway between 11 a.m. Tuesday, part of a monthly grocery campaign that many people rely on, especially with complications in obtaining pandemic unemployment benefits from the state. “It just brings you to tears sometimes.” says Sue Hetrick, who showed up to get food for her family, which includes her 4-year-old child. “We’re fighting. It’s definitely a big help because we have a 4 year old. The times were tough when there was no work.” Sandra Curry, who administers the Butler County Community Partnership, says as long as the people are injured, the Food Drive will maintain its status as a valuable resource. “If you’re feeding someone who is having trouble, I can’t express how important this is to us and the volunteers. Most of these volunteers are here every month, the same volunteers.” The next Food Drive is scheduled for the last Tuesday in February .

Heavy pressures and troubles continue to hover over people who have been financially broken by the pandemic.

That’s why the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, Butler County Food Bank, and Butler County Community Partnership continue to offer monthly assistance to people who are struggling to put food on the table.

More than 320 vehicles arrived at the Lernerville Speedway between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Tuesday to receive boxes of produce, dry food and meat.

It’s part of the monthly food campaign that many people rely on, especially if there are complications in obtaining pandemic unemployment benefits from the state.

“It just brings you to tears sometimes,” says Sue Hetrick, who showed up to get food for her family, which includes her 4-year-old child. “We’re fighting. It’s definitely a big help because we have a 4 year old. The times were tough when there was no work.”

Sandra Curry, who administers the Butler County Community Partnership, says as long as people are injured, the food drive will maintain its status as a valuable resource. “If you feed someone who is struggling, I cannot express how meaningful it is to us and the volunteers too. Most of those volunteers are here every month, the same volunteers.”

The next Food Drive is planned for the last Tuesday in February.

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