“This pandemic obtained off to such a nasty begin within the US.”

A year later, the doctor thinks: “This pandemic got off to such a bad start in the United States.”

Updated: 8:45 p.m. EST March 6, 2021

The first case of COVID-19 was recorded in Pennsylvania on Saturday March 6th. Since then, nearly a million cases and more than 24,000 deaths have been reported in the Commonwealth. Doctor Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Pittsburgh-based Infectious Disease Critical Physician and Emergency Medicine Physician, said in retrospect: Things should have been handled differently. “This pandemic got off to such a bad start in the United States, which meant there was so much inaction, so many wrong measures taken, and so much time wasted that it was becoming impossible to take decisive action by then – people realized this something serious, “he said. Adalha said it doesn’t have to be because of the work he’s doing at Johns Hopkins on pandemic preparedness. They had written reports of the prediction that something like this would happen and found a framework for dealing with it. Instead, he said nothing had happened for months. “January, February, and most of March were squandered where critical action was taken to test the ability to test and isolate, prepare our hospitals, strengthen our nursing homes, and make sure we had enough staff and, most importantly, the protective equipment Ability to test people, none of that ever happened, “he said. “What you had in March was really undiscovered chains of transmission that bubbled up in many places in the country and then went into crisis in hospitals in places like NYC. You had very scared governors extrapolating from NYC and taking very blunt action for not At the time, you knew who was infected and who wasn’t. “Doctor Adalja said that experts knew early on that the disease affected the elderly, but very little was done to prepare nursing homes and staff. Because of the lack of action, he said most deaths and hospital capacity concerns were due to outbreaks in nursing homes: “I think we would have had a very different pandemic in the U.S. and Pennsylvania if nursing home care had been adequate or up to the task and it clearly wasn’t, “he said. Thanks to the vaccine, Doctor Adalja said he was optimistic that we could see a sense of normalcy from the summer onwards. “I think when I look at the pandemic I’m really focusing on how this could have been better because we will face yet another pandemic threat in the future,” he said. “If we don’t fix the problems that are making the US pandemic so aggressive, it will repeat itself all over again,” he said.

The first case of COVID-19 was recorded in Pennsylvania on Saturday March 6th. Since then, nearly a million cases and more than 24,000 deaths have been reported in the Commonwealth.

Doctor Amesh Adalja, a senior scientist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and a Pittsburgh-based Emergency Critical and Medical Emergency Physician for Infectious Diseases, said in retrospect that things should have been handled differently.

“This pandemic got off to such a bad start in the United States, which meant that so much inaction, so many wrong measures, and so much time were wasted that it became impossible to take decisive action when people realized this was something It was serious, “he said.

Dr. Adalha said it doesn’t have to be because of the work he does at Johns Hopkins on pandemic preparedness. They had written reports of the prediction that something like this would happen and found a framework for dealing with it. Instead, he said nothing had happened in months.

“January, February and most of March were wasted where important steps were taken to test the ability to test and isolate, prepare our hospitals, strengthen our nursing homes, ensure we have adequate personal protective equipment, and before everything to develop it. ” One way to test people, none of that ever happened, “he said.” What you had in March were really undiscovered chains of transmission that bubbled over in many places in the country and then threw hospitals in places like NYC in crisis. They had very scared governors extrapolating from NYC and taking very blunt action because they had no way of knowing who was and who wasn’t infected at the time. “

Doctor Adalja said experts knew early on that the disease affected the elderly, but very little was done to prepare nursing homes and staff. Due to the lack of action, he said most deaths and hospital capacity concerns were due to outbreaks in nursing homes.

“I think we would have had a very different pandemic in the US and Pennsylvania if the care in nursing homes were adequate or up to the task and clearly it wouldn’t have,” he said.

Thanks to the vaccine, Doctor Adalja said he was optimistic that we could see a sense of normalcy from summer onwards.

“I think when I look at the pandemic I’m really focusing on how this could have been better because we will face yet another pandemic threat in the future,” he said. “If we don’t fix the problems that are making the US pandemic so aggressive, it will repeat itself all over again,” he said.

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